On-site measurement of EMF sources, and risk assessment to support compliance with CEMFAW Regulations.

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We can assess compliance with the Control of Electromagnetic Fields at Work Regulations 2016 (CEMFAW). Our EMF services include:

  • On-site measurement surveys, to assess exposure against relevant CEMFAW action levels and exposure limit values.
  • Preparation of site-specific risk assessments.
  • Development of a prioritised action plan to support compliance with the CEMFAW Regulations.
  • Support with the implementation of suitable risk reduction measures.
  • Additional measures required for workers at particular risk e.g. pregnant women, those with pacemakers or other medical devices.
  • Provision of bespoke EMF awareness training tailored to the findings of the site-specific risk assessment.

You can view our free webinar on EMF awareness here

How do I control the risk?

By completing an EMF assessment using an isotropic probe to measure EMF exposure. This specialised equipment measures EMF emissions to compare against the current guidelines within The Control of Electronic Fields at Work Regulations 2016 (CEMFAW).

Following the assessment, risk reduction measures ca then be considered, such as  implementing exclusions zones, signage etc.

What is an acceptable EMF level?

The Control of Electronic Fields at Work Regulations 2016 (CEMFAW) transpose the requirements of European Commission Directive 2013/35/EU. This Directive lays down the minimum requirements for the protection of employees from risks to their health and safety arising, or likely to arise, from exposure to electromagnetic fields.

The requirements in the CEMFAW Regulations are based on two sets of values related to EMFs: Action levels (ALs) and exposure limit values (ELVs). These physical quantities are based on the recommendations of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP); more information can be accessed via the ICNIRP3 web pages.

ELVs are the legal limitations on the exposure of employees to EMFs and primarily relate to the levels of exposure to EMFs within the body. These are often impossible or difficult and expensive to measure directly. For this reason a separate set of values, known as ALs, has been produced relating to quantities which can be measured more easily.

The danger of EMF exposure

EMF should not be dealt with lightly. The health effects from exposure can include nerve stimulation on the central and peripheral nervous system of the body, such as muscle contraction and heart arrhythmia. In the worst case, EMF can cause cardiac pacemakers to malfunction, resulting in fatality.

High Risk Activities and Equipment

  • Radio and telecoms broadcast and receiver masts.
  • Any electrical circuit carrying >100A.
  • Dielectric heating and welding.
  • Resistance welding.
  • Induction heating.
  • Non-destructive testing – magnetic particle inspection (MPI), magnetiser/ demagnetiser.
  • Microwave heating and drying.
  • Plasma devices.
  • Furnaces, arc and induction melting.
  • MRI equipment.
  • Electrically powered trains.
  • Radar/ air traffic control.

How can you identify an electromagnetic field?

An EMF is produced whenever a piece of electrical or electronic equipment (i.e. TV, food mixer, computer mobile phone etc.) is used.

EMFs are static electric, static magnetic and time-varying electric, magnetic and electromagnetic (radio wave) fields with frequencies up to 300 GHz.

EMFs are present in virtually all workplaces and if they are of high enough intensity, an employer may need to take action to ensure employees are protected from any adverse effects.

Quantification uses an isotropic probe to measure EMF exposure. This specialised equipment measures EMF emissions across all frequencies and has a sensitivity appropriate for the current safety guidelines and action levels stipulated within CEMFAW*.

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Contact us to arrange an EMF assessment or to find out more: